Saturday, November 29, 2008

Washington Post says EPA, Interior to be transformed under Obama

EPA, Interior Dept. Chiefs Will Be Busy Erasing Bush's Mark
Friday 28 November 2008
by: Juliet Eilperin, The Washington Post

Few federal agencies are expected to undergo as radical a transformation under President-elect Barack Obama as the Environmental Protection Agency and the Interior Department, which have been at the epicenter of many of the Bush administration's most intense scientific and environmental controversies.

The agencies have different mandates - the EPA holds sway over air and water pollution, while Interior administers the nation's vast federal land holdings as well as the Endangered Species Act - but both deal with some of the country's most pressing environmental concerns, such as climate change. And over the past eight years, many career employees and rank-and-file scientists have clashed with Bush appointees over a number of those of issues, including whether the federal government should allow California to regulate tailpipe emissions from automobiles and how best to prevent imperiled species from disappearing altogether.

In June 2007, Obama told reporters in Reno, Nev., that he would not hesitate to reverse many of the environmental policies Bush has enacted by executive order.

"I think the slow chipping away against clean air and clean water has been deeply disturbing," Obama added. "Much of it hasn't gone through Congress. It was done by fiat. That is something that can be changed by an administration, in part by reinvigorating the EPA, which has been demoralized."

Global warming policies are expected to mark one of the sharpest breaks between the Obama and the Bush administrations.

EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson overruled his career advisers in deciding to deny California authority to control tailpipe emissions and rejecting their conclusion that global warming poses a threat to public welfare, and Obama is likely to reverse both of those policies shortly after taking office. This month, the president-elect told delegates to the Governors' Global Climate Summit that he would push for a federal cap-and-trade system designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 and then to cut them an additional 80 percent by 2050, targets Bush has never embraced.

"Delay is no longer an option. Denial is no longer an acceptable response," Obama said in a videotaped message. "The stakes are too high, the consequences too serious."

Jamie Rappaport Clark, executive vice president of the advocacy group Defenders of Wildlife, said that together, the two agencies will help shape the government's response to climate change.

Clark, who headed the Fish and Wildlife Service under President Bill Clinton, is not a formal Obama adviser, but many of her former Clinton colleagues are helping the transition team, including David Hayes, a partner at Latham & Watkins; John Leshy, a professor at the University of California's Hastings College of the Law; and Robert Sussman, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress.

"EPA will play the lead role in crafting a regulatory response," Clark said. "Interior has a huge role to play in adaptation" -- the effort to cope with climate changes that are already happening, such as drought and more frequent wildfires.

EPA spokesman Jonathan Shradar said Wednesday that the agency is focused on finalizing policies on coal-fired power plants and other matters, but he would not speculate on the task the next administration faces: "We'll let the next team decide what their priorities will be when they get here."

With escalating responsibilities, both agencies will need more resources after years when their budgets shrank, relatively speaking. The EPA received $7.5 billion from Congress in 2008, down from $7.8 billion in 2001. Interior has fared slightly better, getting $11.1 billion compared with $10.4 billion in 2001, but that represents more than a 10 percent cut in inflation-adjusted dollars.

Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), who as chairwoman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee has feuded with both Johnson and Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne over global warming and other issues, said in an interview that she has high expectations of the people who will take their places.

"I'm expecting President-elect Obama to select people who really care about the issues they're in charge of, someone who believes in their mission and not someone who's going to undermine their mission," she said. "That's a sea change."

There is a long list of Democrats vying to take the helm of both agencies. The two leading contenders for EPA administrator are Mary Nichols, a favorite of Boxer's who chairs the California Air Resources Board, and Lisa Jackson, who is in the midst of switching from heading New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection to serving as chief of staff to New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine. Other possible nominees include Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Kathleen McGinty; Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Ian Bowles; former Sierra Club president and environmental activist Lisa Renstrom; and Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a Pace University law professor and chairman of the Waterkeeper Alliance, another advocacy group.

The list for Interior is almost as long. Two House Democrats, Raul M. Grijalva (Ariz.) and Mike Thompson (Calif.) are contenders, but Rep. Jay Inslee (D-Wash.), Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer, former Oregon governor John Kitzhaber, National Trust for Historic Preservation President Richard Moe, as well as three former Interior officials - David Hayes, John Leshy and Clark at Defenders of Wildlife - have all been mentioned.

Regardless of who takes over at the agencies, the new leaders will face impatient scrutiny from green groups eager to change the government's trajectory on the environment. Frank O'Donnell, who heads the advocacy group Clean Air Watch, ticked off 10 initiatives he expects the new EPA administrator to undertake, including changing rules on emissions from coal-fired power plants and monitoring airborne lead pollution more closely.

"The Bush administration has cut so many special deals for industry that it could be a Herculean effort reversing them all," O'Donnell said. "The new team is going to have to muck out the regulatory stables."


Staff researcher Madonna Lebling contributed to this report.


Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Polls close at 7:30 p.m. Vote for Lioneld Jordan for mayor

Please click on image to Enlarge photo of woman with her grandson holding signs at South School and Martin Luther King Boulevard, formerly Sixth Street.
Time is short to vote. Don't miss the chance to help elect an honest, steadfast mayor with a heart big enough to value everyone.

Saturday, November 22, 2008

Louise Mann says support Lioneld Jordan to support our police and firefighters

Please click on images to ENLARGE photos of Louise Mann supporting Lioneld Jordan.

I'm sure we all want to show support for our fire and police, the people who risk their lives for us, daily.

They have now stood up against the current mayor. The Fire and Police have come together and endorsed Lioneld Jordan for mayor.

Why would they do that, if they did not feel very strongly there was a need for change? This is an endorsement that comes from the guys in the trenches. They have worked with both candidates.

Please think about this next question? Would you have the courage to come out and openly endorse against your boss? Have you ever taken such a courageous stand? It's not a small thing to do. Imagine the consequences.

Both Walt Eilers and Steve Clark have endorsed Lioneld. The Green groups have endorsed Lioneld. And the Unions have endorsed Lioneld.
These people/groups did not make their endorsements lightly. People are speaking out because they know, from firsthand experience, what kind of leadership would be good for Fayetteville.

I think most of us would agree that our fire and police have been darn good to us over the years.

Let's support our Fire and Police Depts. and give them the leader they have requested, Lioneld Jordan!

Bush moves to destroy wilderness protection

Reply all

What he can destroy in 60 days‏
From: on behalf of Frances Alexander (
Sent: Sat 11/22/08 8:35 AM
2 attachment(s)
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President for 60 More Days, Bush Tearing Apart Protection for America's Wilderness
Thursday 20 November 2008
by: Suzanne Goldenberg, The Guardian UK

Oil shale mining in Rocky Mountains gets go-ahead. "Midnight regulations" to dismantle safeguards.

Washington - George Bush is working at a breakneck pace to dismantle at least 10 major environmental safeguards protecting America's wildlife, national parks and rivers before he leaves office in January.

With barely 60 days to go until Bush hands over to Barack Obama, his White House is working methodically to weaken or reverse an array of regulations that protect America's wilderness from logging or mining operations, and compel factory farms to clean up dangerous waste.

In the latest such move this week, Bush opened up some 800,000 hectares (2m acres) of land in Rocky Mountain states for the development of oil shale, one of the dirtiest fuels on the planet. The law goes into effect on January 17, three days before Obama takes office.

The timing is crucial. Most regulations take effect 60 days after publication, and Bush wants the new rules in place before he leaves the White House on January 20. That will make it more difficult for Obama to undo them.

"There are probably going to be scores of rules that are issued between now and January 20," said John Walke, a senior attorney at the National Resources Defence Council. "And there are at least a dozen very controversial rules that will weaken public health and environment protection that have no business being adopted and would not be acceptable to the incoming Obama administration, based on stances he has taken as a senator and during the campaign."

The flurry of new rules - known as midnight regulations - is part of a broader campaign by the Bush administration to leave a lasting imprint on environmental policy. Some of the actions have provoked widespread protests such as the Bureau of Land Management's plans to auction off 20,000 hectares of oil and gas parcels within sight of Utah's Delicate Arch natural bridge.

The Bush administration is also accused of engaging in a parallel go-slow on court-ordered actions on the environment. "There are the midnight regulations that they are trying to force out before they leave office, and then there are the other things they are trying not to do before they go. A lot of the climate stuff falls into the category of things they would rather not do," said a career official at the Environmental Protection Agency.

Other presidents have worked up to the final moments of their presidency to impose their legacy on history. But Bush has been particularly organised in his campaign to roll back years of protections - not only on the environment, but workplace safety and employee rights.

"This is Bush trying to leave a legacy that supports his ideology," said Gary Bass, executive director of OMB Watch, an independent Washington thinktank that monitors the White House office of management and budget. "This was very strategic and it was in line of the ideology of the Bush administration which has been to put in place a free market and conservative agenda."

The campaign got under way in May when the White House chief of staff, Joshua Bolten, wrote to government agencies asking them to forward proposals for rule changes. Bolten had initially set a November 1 deadline on rule-making. The White House denies that the flurry of rule changes is politically motivated. "What the chief of staff wanted to avoid was this very charge that we would be trying to, in the dark of night in the last days of the administration, be rushing regulations into place ahead of the incoming, next administration," Tony Fratto, the White House spokesman, told reporters.

But OMB Watch notes that the office of management and budget website shows 83 rules reviewed from September 1 to October 31 this year - about double its workload in 2007, 2006 and 2005.

Meanwhile, the Bush administration cut short the timeframe for public comment. In one instance, officials claimed to have reviewed 300,000 comments about changes to wildlife protection within the space of a week.

The new regulations include a provision that would free industrial-scale pig and cattle farms from complying with the Clean Water Act so long as they declare they are not dumping animal waste in lakes and rivers. The rule was finalised on October 31. Mountain-top mining operations will also be exempt from the Clean Water Act, allowing them to dump debris in rivers and lakes. The rule is still under review at the OMB. Coal-fired power plants will no longer be required to install pollution controls or clean up soot and smog pollution.

Yet another of the new rules, which has generated publicity, would allow the Pentagon and other government agencies to embark on new projects without first undertaking studies on the potential dangers to wildlife.

Announcements of further rule changes are expected in the next few days including one that would weaken regulation of perchlorate, a toxin in rocket fuel that can affect brain development in children, in drinking water.

The Bush strategy has prompted a fightback from environmentalists, the Democratic-controlled Congress, and members of the Obama transition team.

John Podesta, who is overseeing the transition, has said that Obama will review the last-minute actions, and will seek to repeal those that are "not in the interests of the country".

Pollute, Baby, Pollute

The last-minute rules passed during the "midnight hours" of the George Bush presidency differ from his predecessors because they are basically a project of deregulation - not regulation. Among the most far-reaching:

Industrial-size pig, cow and chicken farms can disregard the Clean Water Act and air pollution controls.

The interior department can approve development such as mining or logging without consulting wildlife managers about their impact.

Restrictions will be eased so power plants can operate near national parks and wilderness areas.

Pollution controls on new power plants will be downgraded.

Mountain-top mine operators could dump waste into rivers and streams.

2m acres of land in Utah, Wyoming and Colorado opened to development of oil shales, the dirtiest fuel on Earth.

Friday, November 21, 2008

Aubrey Shepherd supports Lioneld Jordan in the Nov. 20, 2008, Fayetteville Free Weekly

Lioneld Jordan offers fair and open government

In the general election, Lioneld Jordan got votes from people from all political parties. Independence of thought and freedom from prejudice are two important qualities people admire about Lioneld Jordan.

Some said they follow city-government meetings on Government Channel and respect Lioneld for his work in eight years of City Council, committee and ward meetings.

Several said his work for neighborhoods made them trust him more than any other official.

Others said they met Lioneld years ago and respected his integrity in private life. Some said they had worked with him and recognized his consistently good judgment and kindness as he rose to a supervisory management position.

Some city workers have said privately that after years of interaction with Lioneld they felt more comfortable working with him than with any other elected official.

People who care about the fertile soil, clean air and water, trees, tall-grass prairie, wildlife, streams and all things living in Fayetteville said they voted for Lionel because of his consistent support of trails and parks and especially his voting to protect Wilson Spring and to create World Peace Wetland Prairie.

Some people said they voted for Jordan because of his support of well-planned developments and because he invites developers to his Ward Four meetings to interact with constituents BEFORE developers commit to projects with flaws easily recognized by people who live near the projects.

Most important is that many long-time Fayetteville residents recognize that Lioneld is dedicated to improving life for everyone in our city, regardless of economic status. He is a working man who reads constantly, listens to everyone and learns every day.

Early voting begins November 18 at the Washington County Courthouse. The county Website lists polling places for runoff election day, November 25.

Please vote to elect Lioneld Jordan mayor of Fayetteville.

Aubrey James Shepherd

Fayetteville, Arkansas

Marsha Melnichak's passing leaves an empty spot in the hearts of Fayetteville residents

Please click on image to ENLARGE photo of Marsha Melnichak (right) and friends visiting the Fayetteville Farmer's Market on October 25, 2008.

Marsha Melnichak died in her sleep Thursday night November 20, 2008, or early this morning, at Washington Regional Hospital in Fayetteville, Arkansas, I was told.
Having visited her Wednesday night at the hospital, I knew her time was short. During the meeting of the Telecommunication Board on Tuesday night, several people spoke off camera of their sadness that she would likely never again attend such meetings and report on them with her clear sense of reality and highly developed ability to sort through the chaff and find the significant points of such city meetings. She earned universal respect from city workers, public officials and area residents who read her news stories.
Few people reach Marsha's high level of competence and integrity in reporting the news.
She covered the beginning of the mayoral campaign well, and it was clear in brief conversations in the weeks since she found herself unable to work that one of her concerns was not being able to continue her work and be on hand next Tuesday to report on the final chapter.
Maybe she realized that she would not be with us by this time. Most of us did not.
Her absence should be a reminder that, whatever goals we set, pursuing them with honesty, good humor and grace is as important as the result.

Thursday, November 20, 2008

Steve Clark's endorsement of Lioneld Jordan on Google video

Please click the "play" arrow to view video of Steve Clark endorsing Lioneld Jordan.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Steve Clark endorses Lioneld Jordan for mayor of Fayetteville, Arkansas

Please click image to enlarge view of Steve Clark as he announces his support for Lioneld Jordan and Alderman Jordan applauding.
Former Arkansas Attorney General Clark finished third in the race for mayor in a six-person field of candidates during the general election. Jordan is in a runoff with the incumbent mayor for the highest office in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Early voting has begun at the Washington County Courthouse and is available from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. Monday will be the final day to vote early at the courthouse and runoff election day is Tuesday, November 25 at regular polling places in Fayetteville.

Steve Clark endorses Lioneld Jordan for mayor of Fayetteville, Arkansas

Please click image to enlarge view of Steve Clark as he announces his support for Lioneld Jordan and Alderman Jordan applauding.
Former Arkansas Attorney General Clark finished third in the race for mayor in a six-person field of candidates during the general election. Jordan is in a runoff with the incumbent mayor for the highest office in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Early voting has begun at the Washington County Courthouse and is available from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. Monday will be the final day to vote early at the courthouse and runoff election day is Tuesday, November 25 at regular polling places in Fayetteville.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette endorses Lioneld Jordan in the runoff for mayor of Fayetteville, Arkansas

EDITORIALS : Still for Lioneld Jordan
Arkansas Democrat-Gazette Northwest Edition
Posted on Wednesday, November 19, 2008

conscientious alderman, is in a run-off for
mayor of Fayetteville. He’s trying to unseat Dan Coody, the two-term incumbent who’s seeking a third term. Mr. Jordan was our choice in the general election earlier this month. He remains our choice in Tuesday’s run-off.
Lioneld Jordan has much to recommend him. In his eight years as alderman, he’s never missed a city council meeting. He’s held monthly meetings in his ward to stay in touch with those who elected him to the city council. Known for his open approach, he listens to all. Even when he disagrees, he’s straightforward enough to explain why. He takes the time to master the difficult issues that come before a city council, and he’s been willing to admit he was wrong when he’s decided to change his mind.
He’s in a tough runoff. His opponent, Mayor Coody, has been a fixture in Fayetteville politics for many years, long predating his first election as mayor in 2000. And the mayor has got lots of supporters to show for it. But his opponent in this runoff has put together a notable coalition in his campaign to become Fayetteville’s next mayor. Mr. Jordan has won the endorsements of Fayetteville’s police officers and firefighters, as well as that of the Sierra Club and the local Green Party. In addition, three other candidates for mayor in the general election have now offered their support to him.
Mayor Coody has had his share of difficulties over the years. He bears ultimate responsibility for the $ 60-million-plus cost overrun for the expansion of the city’s wastewater system. The project came in three years late and had to be rescued with an increase in the city sales tax. He pushed hard for putting up a big hotelplus-condo at the site of the old Mountain Inn. But it has yet to materialize. Instead, the city has gotten a parking lot on the site.
The mayor has also disappointed with his heavy-handed take-over of the city’s Government Channel, which resulted in the cancellation of its public opinion forums. Those forums had been a popular way to provide non-partisan information about issues of interest to anyone who lives in Fayetteville.
Nobody expects Lioneld Jordan to do everything right if he’s elected mayor. But the city can be confident he’ll approach city government with a willingness to hear all sides and take all opinions into account before making the decision he believes is best for Fayetteville. He’s shown commendable openness in his years as an alderman. Based on his record, voters can expect the same from him as mayor. Which is why we’re endorsing him—again.
Copyright © 2001-2008 Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact:

Sunday, November 16, 2008

Letters supporting Lioneld Jordan for mayor on November 16, 2008

Letters to the editor
Northwest Arkansas Times
Posted on Sunday, November 16, 2008

Jordan can be trusted

Early voting for the mayoral runoff election begins on Nov. 18, and Election Day is Nov. 25. I urge you to get out and vote and, when you do, to vote for Lioneld Jordan. Here are three of the many reasons why I will be voting for Lioneld: 1. We need a mayor who believes in balancing the city budget and living within our city income. Last year, it fell to Vice Mayor Jordan to lead the City Council through this difficult task while the mayor was off in Europe doing other things. This year, Jordan joined the Council in passing a resolution directing the mayor to submit a balanced budget, which the mayor refused to do. Lioneld will not need that kind of direction. 2. We need a mayor who believes in closely monitoring large multi-million dollar city projects right from the beginning, not after they have fallen years behind schedule and are running millions of dollars over budget. Contrast the initial mismanagement of the sewer and trails projects by the Streets Committee under Lioneld Jordan’s chairmanship. 3. We need a mayor who not only believes in regular two-way communication with the people, but actually practices it. Contrast Lioneld’s 110 face-to-face Ward 4 and other meetings with the number of such appearances by our mayor over the past eight years. Again, please get out and vote during this runoff, and when you do please remember: Lioneld Jordan — Experience You Can Trust !
William A. Moeller

Incumbent’s campaign disappoints

The Sunday, Nov. 9, Northwest Arkansas Times illustrates strongly why Lioneld Jordan should be Fayetteville’s next mayor. In the article about the runoff race, incumbent Mayor Coody disappoints, but hardly surprises me, by resorting to the politics of fear to down Mr. Jordan. Coody uses the buzzwords “ union, ” the Wal-Mart bogeyman, and “ radical, ” which actually translates as from the roots, to frighten people worried about the city budget. Check the record. Mr. Jordan has certainly had a grassroots campaign, but he has never proposed unionizing city employees. It is Coody who defied the elected city council’s directive to present a balanced budget. Dr. Nick Brown, in a letter the same day, eloquently defines “ sustainability, ” one of Coody’s favorite terms, as including social justice. I believe that if the mayor treats city employees well, they will not need to unionize; the fact that two of the largest, most visible and most depended-upon groups of city employees, namely our firefighters and police, support Lioneld Jordan speaks volumes. As mayor, Lioneld will not throw away money on fancy consultants, when we have plenty of expertise here in town. How difficult can it be for the mayor to put the UAF chancellor on speed-dial ? Lioneld will not direct the city attorney to fight a private howeowner over a sewage mishap, when simply fixing the problem would cost less than 10 percent of the eventual legal bills and settlement. Lioneld has learned that illconceived real estate dealing, such as the Mountain Inn / TIF fiasco, the Wilson Springs purchase, and the Tyson Building saga, are budget drains and not economic salvations. Join with me to return our city to the citizens. Vote for Lioneld Jordan Nov. 25.
Rick Belt

Regarding the runoff

Although two of Lioneld Jordan’s former mayoral opponents (Eilers, Fire Cat ) have now endorsed Jordan, his runoff opponent informs us that the “ dynamic of the campaign will change as mayoral forums allow more time for two candidates to answer questions than was possible with six. ” (Northwest Arkansas Times, Nov. 6 ) Jordan’s opponent asserts that the more “ in-depth ” answers provided in debates will allow voters to “ delve more deeply into issues and public records and history of leadership ” However, those of us who’ve long appreciated Lioneld Jordan’s leadership in Ward 4 and as vice mayor are sure that Lioneld has already outlined the best long-term approaches for Fayetteville’s future development. His mayoral platform and track record build on proven experience, hard work and accountability, rather than rhetoric. And his strong backing and endorsements by Fayetteville’s police and firemen and the Sierra Club, clearly affirm his competence and leadership skill, as well as his working knowledge of how the city operates. Thus we can agree that debates between the two candidates will allow Fayetteville voters to delve into the deeper needs of our community and to judge the two candidates’ respective track records over the past eight years. And we’re certain that voters will agree with us — and his former opponents — that Lioneld Jordan is our best “ in-depth ” candidate to lead the city staff and City Council toward a sustainable, economically-sound future for all of Fayetteville. His honesty and hard work have earned our trust and yours. Please join us in voting for Lioneld Jordan on Nov. 25 — or better yet, vote early, beginning Nov. 18.
Jim Bemis

Copyright © 2001-2008 Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact:

Friday, November 14, 2008

EPA can no longer ignore pollution by coal-fired power plants

Welcome to the first day of our clean energy future.

The Sierra Club received word yesterday that we have won a major decision; the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) will no longer be able to ignore global warming pollution caused by coal-fired power plants [1].
This victory can be the turning point in our fight for clean energy.
We've stopped virtually all new coal plants dead in their tracks.
This ruling means new and proposed coal plants (over 150 have been proposed in the last two years) must now go back to the drawing board to address their carbon dioxide emissions.
This victory would not have been possible without your support. Will you help keep the clean energy momentum going by donating to the Sierra Club today?
With coal as the single largest cause of our nation's global warming pollution, this is a critical step to ensuring a clean energy future.
And it's just the beginning. The ruling gives us the framework we need to make real progress on replacing coal with new clean energy solutions that will repower our economy and help fight climate change.
We need your help now more than ever. We can seize upon this decision and make it the turning point in our fight for clean energy. Please consider donating to the Sierra Club today.
This major breakthrough will strengthen the efforts of Sierra Club activists from all over the country who have been engaged in fighting new coal plants. Our mandate to put an end to dirty coal has just gotten that much stronger.
This ruling opens a number of new doors to our fight. From giving the Obama administration a clean slate to regulate carbon emissions to fighting for the retirement of the fleet of existing, old, dirty coal plants, there is a lot of work to get started on.

Bruce Nilles
National Director, Sierra Club Coal Campaign

1 Bryan Walsh, "Environmentalists Win Big EPA Ruling on Coal Emissions", TIME, Thursday November 13, 2008.,8599,1859049,00.html

Lioneld jordan means green business

Please click on image to ENLARGE for reading.

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Melissa Terry explains why she supports Lioneld Jordan for mayor of Fayetteville, Arkansas

Why I support Lioneld Jordan

In the 10 years I've know him, Lioneld Jordan has consistently been the kind of leader who lets the facts speak for themselves. When we organized the first Scull Creek Clean Up, Lioneld came and worked with us all day pulling tons of trash out of that creek, whereas others showed up only in time for press opportunities. Additionally, when the question came to the city council about ways we can improve our city's recycling program, Lioneld Jordan is the only elected person who ever came out and did a day's work with our awesome recycling crew to see what really needs to be done to improve our current waste reduction program. Lioneld's the kind of guy whose principles are his politics, rather than the other way around. He can bring diverse points of view to tough issues and not burn bridges along the way, as evidenced by the fact that he enjoys the same supporters today as when he ran for office eight years ago. This consistent support base is because Lioneld Jordan understands how to treat people with the respect of an individual and the professionalism of a leader.

Most importantly, Lioneld's a dad. In few other forums are your powers of diplomacy more tested or more tried. He's brought up four children on a state employee's salary for 26 years, so we know he understands about managing a budget.

As an example of making the most of a limited budget, Lioneld had a third the amount of his primary opposition's campaign budget, yet he still managed to wage a successful campaign. Additionally, he garnered the support of both the Fayetteville Police Department and the Fayetteville Fire Department. These are people we trust with making lifechanging decisions and their endorsements are a decisive call for new leadership. The Sierra Club's endorsement also shows that Lioneld can work with our vibrant conservation community to ensure that Fayetteville's local economy and ecology thrive together.

Lioneld can help lead Fayetteville toward being a training hub for the emerging green collar economy by working with technologies incubating at the Genesis Center and by forming a working partnership with John Brown University's Renewable Energy degree program. Building a bridge between these partnerships and service programs like CityYear, AmeriCorps and VISTA can help our community grow more sustainable - without draining our coffers.

And, most importantly, I support Lioneld Jordan because I like him. What he says to your face is what he says behind your back. When he tells you that he supports your program, cause or concern, he actually does. When he doesn't like your position, he tells you. As a downtown property owner, a transparent city government that stands on principles rather than politics sounds pretty good to me. I encourage you to support Lioneld Jordan.
Melissa Terry / Fayetteville

Sunday, November 9, 2008

Climate Project announces grant to RepowerArkansas

RepowerArkansas NEWS RELEASE

The Statewide Coalition RepowerArkansas Receives The First Grant Awarded from
National Organization: The Climate Project


Robert McAfee, of Hackett, AR, one of the 1,000 trained by Al Gore, has been awarded the first ever grant from The Climate Project (TCP) ( to fund a statewide coalition Repower Arkansas. The coalition formed to promote awareness of the importance of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, creating renewable power and green collar jobs. The strategy of the coalition is to develop a citizen alert network to inform the Arkansas General Assembly that the public wants the recommendations from the Arkansas Governor’s Commission to be adopted as law. By enacting these policy options many new green collar jobs can be created. This is a real opportunity for Arkansas to become a leader in repowering energy supplies with clean, renewable energy sources like solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and others.
Robert is a climatologist and an environmental educator. Since December 2006 he has given over 50 presentations of Mr. Gore’s slide show. Four other Arkansas TCP presenters, Kevin Smith, of Helena, Brent Robinson, Fayetteville, Robert Huston, Van Buren, and Cindy Fribourgh of Little Rock will also work with the coalition. Robert and Kevin served on the Governor’s Commission on Global Warming. The final report of the commission was presented to Governor Beebe on October 31.
Over the next three months members of the coalition will travel to communities around the state to discuss the climate crisis with citizens and share the opportunity of green collar jobs for economic development. Green-collar jobs pay family wages and provide opportunities for advancement for a career with increasing skills and wages. While some green jobs require advanced technical skills, most are middle-skill jobs requiring more education than high school, but less than a four-year degree. Much of the work to green our economy involves transforming the places that we live and work, and the way we travel. Repower Arkansas will enlist the support of citizens to inform the General Assembly of the publics growing desire for clean energy and green jobs.
The first event will be November 18th at the University of Arkansas at Monticello, from 7-10pm. These presentations will incorporate the major themes of the Climate Project and The WE Can Solve It Campaign with Arkansas specific applications from the Global Warming Commission’s policy options.
Further information can be obtained at
CONTACTS: Robert McAfee;
Joanna Pollock;
Charlotte Wales

Statewide coalition to promote recommendations of global-warming commission

RepowerArkansas NEWS RELEASE

Statewide Coalition Forms to Promote
Global Warming Commission Recommendations

RepowerArkansas: Green-collar Jobs in the Natural State to Provide Economic Solutions for the Climate Crisis

Repower Arkansas is a statewide coalition of organizations and individuals committed to rallying the legislature to adopt the recommendations of Governor Beebe's Global Warming Commission. By enacting these policy options many new green collar jobs can be created. This is a real opportunity for Arkansas to become a leader in repowering energy supplies with clean, renewable energy sources like solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and others.
The coalition, which is steadily growing, includes organizations, such as, the OMNI Center for Peace, Justice and Ecology, the Carbon Caps Task Force, Ecological Conservation Organization (ECO), Planet Works, Social Sustenance, Arkansas Climate Awareness Project (ARCAP), and the Thinking Like a Mountain Institute. These groups are working with the national organizations “The Climate Project” and “The WE Can Solve It Campaign” to inform the Arkansas public of the opportunities to simultaneously reduce global warming and create thousands of green collar jobs.
Over the next three months members of the coalition will travel to communities around the state to discuss the climate crisis with citizens and share the opportunity of green collar jobs for economic development. Green-collar jobs pay family wages and provide opportunities for advancement for a career with increasing skills and wages. While some green jobs require advanced technical skills, most are middle-skill jobs requiring more education than high school, but less than a four-year degree. Much of the work to green our economy involves transforming the places that we live and work, and the way we travel. Repower Arkansas will enlist the support of citizens to inform the General Assembly of the publics growing desire for clean energy and green jobs.
The first event will be November 18th at the University of Arkansas at Monticello, from 7-10pm. These presentations will incorporate the major themes of the Climate Project and The WE Can Solve It Campaign with Arkansas specific applications from the Global Warming Commission’s policy options.
The coalition believes that the best way to start an economic boom for Arkansas and address the climate crisis is for the 2009 legislative session to approve public policy that enacts the recommendations of Governor Beebe's Global Warming Commission. Further information can be obtained at
CONTACTS: Robert McAfee;
Joanna Pollock;
Charlotte Wales

Saturday, November 8, 2008

Walt Eilers endorses Lioneld Jordan for mayor of Fayetteville, Arkansas

Please click on image to ENLARGE view of Walt Eilers and Lioneld Jordan after Eilers threw his support to Lioneld Jordan in the runoff for mayor of Fayetteville, Arkansas.

Walt Eilers to endorse Lioneld Jordan for mayor at 10 a.m.

Breaking news.....

Former mayoral candidate Walt Eilers will be publicly endorsing Lioneld Jordan at a press conference Saturday morning @ 10:00am at the Urban Table steps (Old Post Office). All are welcome to attend.

Thursday, November 6, 2008

Arkansas panel ignores environmental hazards and issues air permit for coal-fired power plant

Utility gets air permit for plant
Posted on Thursday, November 6, 2008
The final air permit for a $ 1. 6 billion coal-fired power plant to be built in Hempstead County was issued Wednesday by state environmental regulators.

Southwestern Electric Power Co. spokesman Scott McCloud said the company is “extremely pleased” to complete a two-year process that involved two public hearings and hundreds of comments from residents.

Yet any euphoria that plant supporters may experience could be short-lived, as opponents of the project 15 miles northeast of Texarkana plan to appeal the decision.

“I am confident there will be an appeal,” said Chuck Nestrud, a Little Rock attorney who represents private hunting clubs and owners of 18, 000 acres near the site. “But right now we’re not sure which parties would participate.”

McCloud said, “Of course, there is always the possibility of another appeal, and if that occurs, who knows what will happen ? But today is a good day.”

Such a move must be filed with the Arkansas Pollution Control Ecology Commission within 30 days, said Doug Szenher, a spokesman for the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality.

If so, it would place a stay on the permit, he said. That would block SWEPCO’s plans to immediately start full-scale construction on the John W. Turk Jr. power plant, which is expected to take four years to complete.

It would also join two other appeals filed against the 600-megawatt facility.

One is before the 8 th U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis. It contests a federal judge’s July ruling that certain types of construction are allowed before obtaining an air permit.

The other is before the Arkansas Court of Appeals. It contends that the Arkansas Public Service Commission’s 2-1 approval of the plant in November 2007 was improper because it ruled on SWEPCO’s need to provide additional power and need for the Turk plant itself in separate hearings.

Once plant construction begins, it would create up to 1, 400 jobs at the height of the project and 110 permanent jobs once the plant is completed, SWEPCO said. The project would generate about $ 38 million in sales and property tax revenue and an annual payroll of $ 9 million to southwest Arkansas.

However, the plant site is near one of Arkansas’ most ecologically sensitive areas. This includes 2, 000-acre Grassy Lake, which is home to alligators, migratory birds and some of Arkansas’ last cypress swamps and stands of virgin timber.

Environmental activists decried Environmental Quality Department’s decision, noting that the Governor’s Commission on Global Warming recently recommended a moratorium on any new coal-fired power plants in Arkansas until 2020.

“This battle is not over,” said Glen Hooks, senior regional representative for the Sierra Club. “Expect that Sierra Club and our allies will use every tool in our arsenal and fight this plant until absolutely all avenues have been exhausted, up to and including legal challenges.”

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Tuesday, November 4, 2008

Fran Alexander supports Lioneld Jordan

Please click on image to ENLARGE photo of Fran Alexander with fire and police signs supporting Lioneld Jordan.

Sunday, November 2, 2008

Please vote for Lioneld Jordan for mayor of Fayetteville, Arkansas

Please vote for Lioneld Jordan for mayor

Lioneld Jordan has been my choice for mayor of Fayetteville since the beginning of discussion of the upcoming election more than a year ago.
There is no one in the race who can be expected to do more to protect the environment of our city, the people of our city or make better decisions for the future of our city.
Lioneld was born in Fayetteville. I wasn't. I have never been able to call any other place home even when I worked in Little Rock for a few years. But, if anyone loves Fayetteville more than I do, it is Lioneld.
And no one in public life since I first attended graduate school at the University of Arkansas in 1966 has more consistently earned my respect.
I have found him always willing to listen to the concerns of everyone. The fact that he understands and relates to working people in my Town Branch neighborhood in south Fayetteville has been very important to us in recent years.
He supported our effort to save a parcel of wetland prairie from an intense development as we raised money to make the land a city nature park. The project would have wedged 48 apartments into a beautiful and old single-family neighborhood with no concern for the sensitive environment.
He voted to protect the Wilson Spring property, a much bigger and more unusually delicate ecosystem than almost any place this side of the Buffalo River,
He earned the endorsement of the Sierra Club in part for those votes and for his support of parks and trails and the steep, timbered hillsides of our city.
He has earned the endorsement of the firefighters and police officers of our city. He has earned the endorsement of the union of members of the staff and faculty of the University of Arkansas, where he has worked for decades.
He has earned the respect and endorsement of the local Green Party.
Among people I know, he has strong support among those whose statewide and national votes will be for candidates of both Democratic and Republican parties. His record stands on its own. He is the kind of person that most members of both major parties want to see on their ticket.
And he has been endorsed by the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.
As a member of the OMNI Center for Peace, Justice and Ecology, I am only one of many who have voted for Lioneld, because he is strong in all the areas of OMNI's concern.
I am among the members of the Carbon Caps Task Force who support Lioneld.
I have friends who support the Nature Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, the Arkansas Wildlife Federation, Audubon Arkansas, the National Audubon Society, Quail Unlimited and many unaffiliated hunters and fishermen and bird-watchers and nature lovers who have expressed support for Lioneld.
Most important, however, are the working people of Fayetteville who know and respect Lioneld and believe that he will continue to give them a voice in city government, even as he works to create new jobs in the city and housing for low-income residents and to protect the environment while negotiating the best possible development plans as our city continues to grow.
Lioneld respects everyone and shows no prejudice toward anyone. He listens to all and learns and strives to make decisions fair to all. He is indeed the real deal.
Aubrey James Shepherd